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hotio/rflood

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docker.io / ghcr.io
rTorrent / Flood

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What is this?

A docker image with rTorrent and the Flood UI, also optional WireGuard VPN support.

Starting the container

docker run --rm \
    --name rflood \
    -p 3000:3000 \
    -e PUID=1000 \
    -e PGID=1000 \
    -e UMASK=002 \
    -e TZ="Etc/UTC" \
    -e FLOOD_AUTH="false" \
    -v /<host_folder_config>:/config \
    cr.hotio.dev/hotio/rflood
version: "3.7"

services:
  rflood:
    container_name: rflood
    image: cr.hotio.dev/hotio/rflood
    ports:
      - "3000:3000"
    environment:
      - PUID=1000
      - PGID=1000
      - UMASK=002
      - TZ=Etc/UTC
      - FLOOD_AUTH=false
    volumes:
      - /<host_folder_config>:/config
docker run --rm \
    --name rflood \
    -p 3000:3000 \
    -p 8118:8118 \
    -e PUID=1000 \
    -e PGID=1000 \
    -e UMASK=002 \
    -e TZ="Etc/UTC" \
    -e VPN_ENABLED="true" \
    -e VPN_LAN_NETWORK="" \
    -e VPN_CONF="wg0" \
    -e VPN_ADDITIONAL_PORTS="" \
    -e PRIVOXY_ENABLED="false" \
    -e FLOOD_AUTH="false" \
    -v /<host_folder_config>:/config \
    --cap-add=NET_ADMIN \
    --sysctl="net.ipv4.conf.all.src_valid_mark=1" \
    --sysctl="net.ipv6.conf.all.disable_ipv6=0" \
    cr.hotio.dev/hotio/rflood
version: "3.7"

services:
  rflood:
    container_name: rflood
    image: cr.hotio.dev/hotio/rflood
    ports:
      - "3000:3000"
      - "8118:8118"
    environment:
      - PUID=1000
      - PGID=1000
      - UMASK=002
      - TZ=Etc/UTC
      - VPN_ENABLED=true
      - VPN_LAN_NETWORK
      - VPN_CONF=wg0
      - VPN_ADDITIONAL_PORTS
      - PRIVOXY_ENABLED=false
      - FLOOD_AUTH=false
    volumes:
      - /<host_folder_config>:/config
    cap_add:
      - NET_ADMIN
    sysctls:
      - net.ipv4.conf.all.src_valid_mark=1
      - net.ipv6.conf.all.disable_ipv6=0

In most cases you'll need to add additional volumes, depending on your own personal preference, to get access to your files.

Tags

Tag Description Version Commit SHA Commit Message Last Updated Age

Tags

The above table reflects the current state of the Git repository. The docker repository is mainly in sync, unless builds fail or commits are pushed for which no builds are started (usually indicated with [skip ci] in the commit message). You can click on the tag's name to go to its corresponding branch on GitHub, clicking the commit sha brings you to the git diff of that commit.

Changing the WebUI port

Under certain circumstances it's required to run the WebUI on a different internal port, you can do that by modifying the environment variable WEBUI_PORTS accordingly. It should be in the format xxxx/tcp,xxxx/udp, take a look at the default with docker logs (variable is printed at container start) or docker inspect.

WireGuard VPN support

There needs to be a file wg0.conf located in /config/wireguard and you need to set the variable VPN_ENABLED to true for the VPN to start.

The part with net.ipv6.conf.all.disable_ipv6=0 is optional or you can set it to 1 if there is no need for ipv6 and you want to disable ipv6, no attempt will be made in that case to set ip6tables rules and can prevent an error if the module ip6table_filter isn't loaded on the host. The WireGuard configuration should not have any ipv6 related stuff when ipv6 is disabled, otherwise creating the interface will fail. If your vpn provider supports ipv6 and you keep it enabled, you'll have full ipv6 connectivity over the vpn connection (confirmed with Mullvad). If for any reason there's a failure trying to setup ip6tables rules, you'll probably need to do sudo modprobe ip6table_filter on the host, this will mostly happen on systems that have ipv6 completely disabled.

The environment variable VPN_LAN_NETWORK can be set to for example 192.168.1.0/24, 192.168.1.0/24,192.168.44.0/24 or 192.168.1.33, so you can get access to the webui or other additional ports (see below).

If you need to expose additional ports you can use VPN_ADDITIONAL_PORTS, for example VPN_ADDITIONAL_PORTS=7878/tcp,9117/tcp. Every port in this list will be blocked on the vpn interface, so that there's no risk that they might be exposed to the world via the vpn (mostly there in case your vpn provider screws up and piece of mind). Why would you need this? Wanting to route traffic from other containers over the vpn is probably the most used scenario.

wg0.conf example

This is an example of how your wg0.conf should look like. In case you have no need for ipv6 connectivity, make sure that you've got it disabled with net.ipv6.conf.all.disable_ipv6=1 and your wg0.conf does not contain any ipv6 stuff. Also make sure you remove any PreUp, PostUp, PreDown, PostDown stuff that your provider might have added (unless you know what it does). When using Mullvad, this means that you shouldn't enable the Kill Switch option.

[Interface]
PrivateKey = supersecretprivatekey
Address = xx.xx.xxx.xxx/32
DNS = 1.1.1.1

[Peer]
PublicKey = publickey
AllowedIPs = 0.0.0.0/0
Endpoint = xxx.x.xxx.x:51820

WireGuard Go

This image includes wireguard-go, the Go implementation of WireGuard which runs in userspace. Systems like Synology, Qnap or others with missing kernel modules can make use of this to establish a WireGuard VPN connection. It requires the following two changes.

A change to your wg0.conf, due to a long lasting bug in WireGuard on these systems. You'll need to change the AllowedIPs line to have WireGuard start up properly. Also an extra PostUp might have to be added, play with them to see what works best for your particular system.

[Interface]
...
PostUp = wg set wg0 fwmark 51820 && ip -4 rule add not fwmark 51820 table 51820 && ip -4 rule add table main suppress_prefixlength 0 && iptables-restore -n
...

...
[Peer]
...
AllowedIPs = 0.0.0.0/1,128.0.0.0/1
...

Next, you'll also need to add a device mapping.

--device /dev/net/tun:/dev/net/tun
devices:
  - /dev/net/tun:/dev/net/tun